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Participatory Land Use Planning (PLUP) on West-Kalimantan

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2010-2013

An alliance of Indonesian and Dutch non-governmental organisations and universities and an international research institution has conducted a pilot project aiming to facilitate the integration of community maps into formal district-level spatial planning procedures. The geographical focus of the project was on West Kalimantan – one of the top oil palm producing regions in the world – with a high number of oil palm related conflicts and ambitious plans to expand the area under oil palm.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION


Indonesia is one of the world’s largest producers of palm oil and has ambitious plans for the further expansion of its oil palm plantations. There is a lot of concern that such expansion is going to have negative consequences for local people. In the recent past, large-scale expansion has often violated local customary land rights, leading to conflicts between communities and companies. In order to prevent such conflicts, proper site identification of oil palm plantations

is a sin qua non. The oil palm companies would also benefit from better planning, not in the least because unsolved land conflicts damage their image and may result in trade restrictions.

 

Current land-use planning in Indonesia is based on formal maps that make no mention of customary and village boundaries. This makes communities vulnerable, as oil palm companies may expand their plantations on community land without the consent of the local people who use this land. Participatory land-use planning (PLUP) can help address this. PLUP refers to a type of land-use planning that is people-centred and bottom-up, incorporates input from all relevant stakeholders and recognizes locally specific socio-cultural, economic and environmental conditions (see, e.g. Wehrmann, 2011). It has the potential to prevent land-use conflicts and land grabbing. This is particularly important in Indonesia where space is contested and customary land rights are seldom legally formalised.

ROLE OF BOTH ENDS


Both ENDS has been responsible for the project coordination, financial management, liaison with RSPO and plantation companies and audiovisual production.

FINANCIAL PARTNERS


The project was funded by Agentschap NL and co-funded by the MFS II Ecosystems Alliance and the Ford Foundation.

USEFUL LINKS


BOTH ENDS CONTACTPERSONS



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